ExcelinEd in Action: Lawmakers Shouldn’t Pick Winners and Losers in Education

ExcelinEd in Action: Lawmakers Shouldn’t Pick Winners and Losers in Education

ExcelinEd in Action: Lawmakers Shouldn’t Pick Winners and Losers in Education
Initial House Vote Guts Programs that Serves 7,500+ Students

Tallahassee, Fla – Patricia Levesque, Executive Director of Excellence in Education in Action (ExcelinEd in Action) released the following statement regarding today’s public hearing on HB 122 by the Louisiana Senate Finance Committee. HB 122 would, among other things, defund two school choice programs and greatly impact the state’s ability to measure student readiness for college and career.

Today’s powerful testimony from parents of scholarship students should send a strong message to Louisiana lawmakers. The rash action by the Louisiana House of Representatives to effectively gut two school choice programs places the education of 7,500 children directly in harm’s way.

“Every child should have access to the school or learning environment that best equips him or her to succeed. Since 2008, thousands of Louisiana families and students, including those with special needs, have been empowered with school choice. Lawmakers should not be picking winners and losers when it comes to our children and their education. 

“Furthermore, these cuts would significantly curb- if not entirely halt- the Louisiana Department of Education’s ability to measure students for college and career readiness. We encourage the Louisiana Senate to restore these funds and ensure that parents, students and teachers have the resources they need to succeed. Louisiana’s most vulnerable children deserve better.”

Programs are Saving Funds and Serving States Most Vulnerable Students

  • These programs have more than a 90 percent satisfaction rating from parents
  • The state’s most vulnerable students: those with disabilities and low-income students zoned for ‘C,’ ‘D,’ or ‘F’ rated schools are the top beneficiaries of this program.
  • This action is being done under the guise of saving money, but research has shown that the state’s largest choice program saved the state more than $12 million in its first three years of operation.

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